Monday, May 25, 2020

The Theme Of Tradition In Shirley Jacksons The Lottery

DEATH BY TRADITION Henry James once said, â€Å"It takes an endless amount of history to make a little tradition.† In the short story, â€Å"The Lottery,† by Shirley Jackson deals with the insignificant nature of humanity when it comes to traditions. Today when one thinks about winning, one does not think about the community or close relatives; one thinks about how one is going to spend the money received. However, in Jackson’s short story, â€Å"The Lottery† represents a human sacrifice by means of stoning with the entire village participating. The lottery is a symbol that explains the rituals, and traditions which drive the community. Throughout the story, tradition plays an important role in the villagers’ lives. Tradition can cause needless†¦show more content†¦In the hands of both the old and the very young, the reader can determine that the lottery will continue to be an accepted tradition by future generations. For the villagers, the black box is very symbolic. Jackson states that â€Å"Mr. Summers spoke frequently to the villagers about making a new box, but no one liked to upset even as much tradition as was represented by the black box.†1 The black box reveals how firmly rooted the villagers are in the lottery’s tradition and how threatening they find the idea of change. The villagers find no reason in keeping the box aside from the vague story about the box’s origins. It is falling apart and shabby in appearance and barely resembles a box, but the villagers take pride in the ritual of the lottery. The villagers believe that if the box is changed their fear of change will become a reality. The black box, where all the names are held and drawn from on the day of the lottery, symbolizes more than one aspect of tradition. For instance, the box shows how little tradition can mean to everyday life; during most of the year, it is simply stashed in a barn or set on a shelf in the Martin grocery store and left the re. However, on June 27th, the day of the lottery, it would seem to be the most important box ever made. It is stated that it is quite odd that even though no one knew the actual origin of the black box†, but the villagers were very reluctant to change what they saw as an essential part of the lotteryShow MoreRelatedSummary On The Allegory Of Shirley Jacksons The Lottery871 Words   |  4 Pages Shirley Jackson’s story â€Å"The Lottery† serves as an allegory regarding humankinds inherent to be cruel and society’s ability to inure to violence. The author’s use of a third-person dramatic narrative combined with strong themes, symbols and irony clearly supports the lesson Jackson was trying to portray. Jackson’s short story shows how easy it is to be hostile when a group of villagers with a herd mentality blindly follow an outdated tradition and that evil knows no boundaries. JacksonRead MoreCompare and Contrast Essay1047 Words   |  5 Pagesâ€Å"Young Goodman Brown† and â€Å"The Lottery† By: Melissa A. Reeves Professor Andrew Smith ENGL 102-B46 LUO Thesis Statement The stories â€Å"The Lottery† and â€Å"Young Goodman Brown† both appear to show that human behavior and judgment can be flawed, even if the person’s intentions appear good to them. There is a level of fear and underlying evil in Puritan settings in both stories. I. Introduction/Statement of Thesis II. Themes and Author’s Purpose A. The Lottery i. Just because somethingRead MoreThe Lottery by Shirley Jackson1764 Words   |  7 Pagesfilled with excitement and eeriness, leaving the reader speechless. The Lottery , a short story written by famous writer Shirley Jackson, created an uproar on June 26, 1948, when it was published in the magazine The New Yorker (Ball). The gothic thriller, set in an unknown time and place, shares the tradition of a small town, a little larger than three hundred people, in which a drawing is held once a year. In this â€Å"Lottery,† each family’s husband draws a slip of paper from a black box. The husbandRead MoreIgnornance of Tradition in The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson1014 Words   |  5 Pages Tradition, defined as the handing down of information, beliefs, and customs by word of mouth or by example from one generation to another without written instruction. (Tradition) Tradition is a core trait of humanity, from the time before recorded history to present , humanity has followed traditions or customs that have been passed down from generation to generation. More often than not communities all over the world blindly follow these practices with little regard to who startedRead MoreThe Lottery By Shirley Jackson931 Words   |  4 PagesIn 1948 Shirley Jackson composed the controversial short story â€Å"The Lottery.† Generally speaking, a title such as â€Å"The Lottery† is usually affiliated with an optimistic outlook. However, Jackson’s approach is quite unorthodox and will surely leave readers contemplating the intent of her content. The story exposes a crude, senseless lottery system in which random villagers are murdered amongst their peers. Essentially, the lottery system counteracts as a form of population control, but negatives easilyRead MoreAnalysis Of Shirley Jacksons The Lottery1303 Words   |  6 PagesKotter, tradition is a very powerful force (qtd. in AZQuotes). In Shirley Jacksons chilling story Th e Lottery, a town celebrates a special custom of stoning people to death every year. Jackson perfectly depicts a possible event that may occur from blindly following tradition without evaluating the purpose or usefulness of it in the first place. Jackson’s use of plot, theme, and symbolism reveal the evil reality of blind faith, tradition, and their consequences. Initially, Jackson’s twisted plotRead MorePsychoanalytic Criticism Of The Lottery999 Words   |  4 PagesIn Shirley Jackson’s â€Å"The Lottery,† the story begins on a sunny day that imposes gossip and frenzy around the town. In this location, they conduct a â€Å"lottery† that involves the families of the town to go into a drawing. Once the drawing is done, the family that is chosen is forced to commence into another lottery between themselves. The winner of the lottery is used as a sacrifice for the town and is pelted by stones thrown from the community, including children. Furthermore, the basis of â€Å"The Lottery†Read MoreSymbolism in The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson Essay example1173 Words   |  5 PagesWhen most people play the lottery today, they think about having wealth. Generally, people who win are happy about it whether they win one dollar or a million. The lottery in our society has grown to support education and it is often worth several million dollars. Usually, the winner of the lottery gains a lot of recognition for the money they win. But what would happen if there was a small town where people held a yearly lottery in which the â€Å"winner† was the member of the town who was not sacrificedRead More, Symbolism, And Themes In The Lottery, By Shirley Jackson1252 Words   |  6 PagesShirley Jackson’s The Lottery, is a realism story that was written for the main purpose of entertainment. Jackson writes about a small village that gathers every year for an event they call â€Å"The Lottery†. Every head of households comes up and draws a slip of paper from the box. Bill Hutchinson draws the first slip of paper with the black dot but Tessie Hutchinson quickly exclaims the lottery is not fair. Mr. Summers then puts five slips of paper back into the box, one for each of the family membersRead MoreEssay on Shirley Jackson and Her Short Stories631 Words   |  3 PagesShirley Jackson’ s stories often had a woman as the central character who was in search of a more important life other than the conventional wife and mother. These characters however were often chastised for their refusal to conform to a woman’s traditional way of life. Much like her characters, throughout Shirley Jackson’s life, she also rejected the idea of fitting into societys perception of a womans role. Shirley Jackson was married to writer and literary critic Stanley Edgar Hyman. Hyman

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Japanese Comfort Women - 1493 Words

Japanese Comfort Women It is estimated that between one and two hundred thousand female sex slaves were forced to deliver sexual services to Japanese soldiers, both before and during World War II. These women were known as comfort women and the Imperial Conference, which was composed of the emperor, representatives from the armed forces and the main Cabinet ministers, approved their use by Japanese soldiers. (Walkom) The term comfort women refers to the victims of a premeditated systematic plan originated and implemented by the government of Japan to enslave women considered inferior and subject them to repeated mass rapes, said Michael D. Hausefeld, one of over 35 lawyers in his firm representing the former sexual prisoners in a class†¦show more content†¦In Japan, infected women were killed. Their food was mixed with cyanide, their bodies taken to a cave and finally, the cave was blown up with a grenade. The comfort houses made money off these women and it is believed that the Japanese government paid them, as most of the soldiers paid by coupons. As soon as the war was finished, the Japanese Imperialist guards disappeared without trace. Most comfort women describe the experience this way, Suddenly, the soldiers came no more, and upon asking we found that the war had ended. In other regions, as the Japanese committed â€Å"harikari, the women were forced to do the same. In extreme cases, the women were put in a cave and blown up. After the war, many of the comfort women were too sick to be moved and were taken under the care of the American army. Most of the women were left with no place to go, as they were in a strange country with no money, and were too humiliated to go home. According to one comfort woman, my bodys wasted, therefore I do not dare go home in fear of being ignored and looked down upon. Even after the war ended, the comfort women were not free. Their guilty minds and inferiority complexes kept them from returning home and they stayed in foreign countries. The small amount that married, were often forced to separate after the fact that they were comfort women was known, or they were divorced because they could not have children. The victims are stillShow MoreRelatedEssay on Japanese Comfort Women1011 Words   |  5 Pagesrights is increasing, atrocities of the Japanese Imperial Army are unveiling. â€Å"Comfort women† is sexual slavery system that was utilized by the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II. Due to pervious traumatic experiences and inputs they had, the struggle of former sex slaves for their rights and justice started in 1991, which is still continuing in present times. While they are declaring that Japanese Imperial Military trampled on their rights, some Japanese officials claim that Japan did not intrudeRead MoreEssay on Korean Comfort Women2590 Words   |  11 Pages Comfort women, or ianfu as they are called in Korean, are females who were forced sex slaves for the Japanese Imperial Army (Chunghee). Some of the women were dragged off with physical force as their families wept, while others were actually sold to the army by their destitute families (Watanabe). Still othe r were officially drafted by the Japanese Imperial Army and believed they would be factory workers or nurses (Hwang in Schellstede 4). Some Korean village leaders were ordered to send youngRead MorePreventing Sexual Diseases During World War I1372 Words   |  6 Pageshardly by a Japanese soldier that causes her arm broke, and it healed twists out of shape. Although comfort women regularly got medical examinations for the purpose of preventing sexual diseases, they could not get any further treatments for other health issues, such as broken bones, injuries from repeated abuse, and sexual intercourse. For these reasons, Japan has caused comfort women serious difficulties along with the miserable suffering from solemn physical injuries. As for comfort women, they hadRead More Yuki Tanakas Japans Comfort Women Essay examples1721 Words   |  7 PagesYuki Tanakas Japans Comfort Women This paper is a review of the book Japan’s Comfort Women-Sexual slavery and prostitution during WWII and the US occupation by Yuki Tanaka. This book was published in 2002 by Routledge. The book deals with the thousands of Japanese, Korean, Chinese and other Asian and European women who were victims of organized sexual violence and prostitution by means of â€Å"comfort stations† setup by the Japanese military during World War II.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  As we first get intoRead MoreMilitary Prostitution During Japan s Imperial Rule864 Words   |  4 Pageshistorians have addressed the issue of military prostitution during Japan’s imperial rule and the United States role in it during their reign. For roughly 50 years’ comfort women were the silent victims of war. During the 1990’s and 2000’s many Korean comfort women came into the lime light by opening up about their experiences in the comfort system. The Feminist Studies journal published Na Young Lee’s scholarly work, â€Å"The Construction of Military Prostitution in South Korea during the U.S. MilitaryRead MoreEssay on Asian Women in the Eyes of Americans2297 Words   |  10 Pages Introduction The history of Asian women has many facets. I am about to touch on two key monumental points over a sixty year span that have shaped the views of Asian women in the eyes of Americans. As a brief overview, from as early as the 1940s, Asian women were recruited to serve their soldiers during World War II as sex slaves. Forty years later, the dawning of the 1980s brought about the desire of Asian women into American households and sparked the mail order bride phenomenonRead MorePost World War II : A Major Transformation Into What Is Now Globalisation?1806 Words   |  8 Pagesthat the men believe the women of color to be naturally sexual which meant they were able to act out fantasies that weren’t proper with white women. When white women were placed on pedestals, women of color were the ones being exploited. The major expansion of sexual exploitation and trafficking as a commercial commodity came during World War II. In the past thirty years, there has been a development in the information regarding the sexual violence against Asian women during World War II. BetweenRead MoreChina Vs Jap More Than A Century Of Conflict1381 Words   |  6 PagesChina and Japan have had conflict after conflict, from the first Sino-Japanese war between the Qing Empire and the Empire of Japan then the second Sino-Japanese war nearly 50 years later. The conflict between these two countries stems from fights over territory to constant scrutinization between the two because of cultural differences and what I believe has begun to exhibit signs of cultural incompetence. The First Sino- Japanese war allowed Japan to emerge as a major world power while revealing theRead MoreJapan s Foreign Policy During The End Of The Twentieth And Early Twentieth Century Essay1199 Words   |  5 Pageswas a strong militaristic country that held a strong power and influence in the Asia Pacific region. It was an expansionist and strong imperialist nation similar as the Western colonizers such as England, the Dutch, Russia, France and Germany. The Japanese empire extended from the Dutch East Indies in the south to Manchuria in the north before the country surrendered on September 1945 to the Allies. The Allied Power led by General Douglas MacArthur had occupied Japan for several years before it wasRead MoreThe During The Second World War Essay1735 Words   |  7 PagesStates Navy starting in 1944. During his time in the war he was able to visit many islands that were once being occupied by the Japanese and could see the remainders of their rule. He was able to see wha t had happened to the local people who got caught in the middle of a war that they had no place in and how it affect all of them. That is what I researched, how the Japanese treated the people that they occupied and what had happened to the people during the Second World War. Before the start of

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Chaucerian times Essay Example For Students

Chaucerian times Essay The wife is renown from the beginning of the prologue as a character with little regard for anything or anyone else with her carefree attitude displayed most commonly in her speeches about sex. However in regard to the entire prologue as a tale of licence and lust would perhaps be a too restricted overview. The prologue also provides the audience with many other prominent themes such as religion, marriage and female equality in Chaucerian times. Licence however is significant to the Wife of Baths prologue. Her strength of character provides the prologue with a sense of freedom and little regard for anything. This is demonstrated in particular with her lack of hesitance to challenge authority figures, in particular male and religious authoritys. In the opening lines of the prologue this behaviour is established where the wife challenges men, especially the wise, daun salomon who she claims had hadde wives mo than oon. This in particular demonstrates her lack of care for anyone else and her self-freedom due to the fact those she is opposing (men) contribute to the pilgrimage the most; there were few women on the pilgrimage. Her desire for dominance and power over her husbands is crucial in illustrating this idea of licence, in particular in connection with Jankin. The Wife of Bath clearly doesnt abide by societys conventional role of women and consistently objects to Jankins opinions and remarks. She readily admits that with her fist so took him on the cheke and doesnt appear to mind informing the audience of this. It indicates her need to be in control at all times over her husbands. Her treatment of the other husbands supports these ideas too in the way in which she manipulates them and shows little consideration for them. This is clear in the way she tells the audience with delight how badly she treated them O lord! The peyne I dide hem and the wo implying she had little regret for how she behaved. Her careless attitude is also displayed when she comically suggests that even if the pope hadde seten hem beside she wouldnt have stopped shouting. This is a very good illustration of her character as a whole and her free from care approach to life. Both the idea of licence and lust is prominent in the prologue, as this is a significant part of the Wifes character as she is rarely hesitant to say herself. From the early parts of the prologue she honestly reveals Which yifte of God hadde he for alle his wives! suggesting she likes sex and is not afraid to say it, also considering the time in which this was set; meaning this would be very surprising to hear from a women. Not only does this display her lack of care but also the aspect of lust. The idea is of lust is represented throughout the prologue with the Wifes explicit details of her sex life. She is often crude in the way she talks about sex, not afraid to use what would be thought as vulgar language in her descriptions as at one point she tells the pilgrimage how she had the beste quoniam mighte be. However this is a skill she uses to introduce a comical aspect into her stories; she doesnt mind sharing the most intimate details and it would suggest she would never fail in interesting her audience by using this technique. However behind the Wifes often crude and care free attitude there are many more sides to her character that are not so obvious. Religion is something which the Wife appears to have a good knowledge of with many references to important figures in her anecdotes, even though her quotes are not quite accurate on many occasions. However sometimes as an audience this may again be a faà ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ade, as often her misquotations are used to her advantage and perhaps used as part of her plan to win arguments. .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 , .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 .postImageUrl , .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 , .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639:hover , .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639:visited , .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639:active { border:0!important; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639:active , .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639 .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u1cfb8e5e5a8eebe736669398ca073639:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Battle Royal EssayAstrology is another of her interests, using this again to support arguments, in particular justifying her adultery; claiming a wise astrologer Daun Ptholome said the famous proverb of alle men his wisdom is the hyeste, That rekketh nevere who hath the world in honde. Basically claiming the contented man is he who doesnt care how much another man has, suggesting that a contented man shouldnt mind if she commits adultery. Again this would be likely to provoke amusement in the pilgrimage due to the way in which the Wife manipulates nearly anything to her advantage. Also again her lack of care and respect for her marriages illustrate both licence and lust in the prologue. In conclusion, even though licence and lust are prominent ideas throughout the prologue there are many other less apparent issues behind the Wifes bold character. Even though many of the other ideas raised have some connection with the Wifes love of sex, the issues provide other themes such as religion, dominance and feminism. Therefore I would conclude licence and lust are central to the prologue, however the description stated in the question is perhaps too restricted and does not allow the audience to acknowledge the other significant issues raised by the complex character and prologue in general.

Saturday, April 11, 2020

The Impact of Rapid Industrialization on Life Expectancy

Introduction Within the past few decades, the developing world has slowly but surely begun to catch up with 1st world countries both in economic capability and local industrial capacity. However, such developments are still fairly limited with developing countries still far from the health and safety standards that are present within developed economies.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on The Impact of Rapid Industrialization on Life Expectancy specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More One clear limitation that contributes towards declining life expectancy can be seen within the context of the safety standards of food within developing countries such as Vietnam and Saudi Arabia. Despite the rapid industrialization such countries have had within the past two decades, lacklustre food safety standards both in preparation and handling is one of the prime causes for the various food poisoning scares affecting these areas. On the other end of the spectrum, rapid industrialization has also contributed towards the deterioration of the health of local populaces within the developed world. Smog from coal based power plants as well as the chemical runoff from factories going into the various rivers and streams has severely affected the health of local populations resulting in the development of not only lung related diseases but chemical poisoning as well due to the ingestion of polluted water. It is based on this that this paper will examine food safety standards and rapid industrialization as two of the factors behind low life expectancy within the developed world. It is the primary assumption of this study that exposure to subpar food safety standards as well as pollution through rapid industrialization has significantly impacted the life expectancy of local populations within the developing world. Food Safety Standards Over the years, numerous processes have been developed in order to ensure that the handling and storage of food is conducted in a safe and sterile manner. These processes have been developed in response to various types of bacteria such as E. coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and a plethora of similar pathogens that can develop in food that has not been handled, processed or stored properly (Baumgartner, 2000). The end result are cases of food poisoning which can range from mild to severe symptoms. Condrad (2000) points out that the economic reality of countries such as Pakistan, India, Saudi Arabia and Vietnam where a vast majority of the citizenry lives below the poverty line prevents the implementation of ISO 22000 safety standards given the significant extra cost that comes with the implementation of such procedures (Condrad 2000). Furthermore, food preparation in certain cultures may seem â€Å"dirty† or â€Å"unhygienic† to Western standards, however, they have been a part of the traditional knowledge makeup of a local society to such an extent th at the imposition of new practices to change age old cultural methods of food preparation is often met with significant local opposition (Al-Kandari Jukes, 2012).Advertising Looking for essay on social sciences? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Lastly, government imposed safety measures on food storage, handling and preparation differs from country to country as evidenced by the trade restrictions on certain types of food from Asia to the Western world given the differences in food safety standards (Al-Kandari Jukes, 2012). The end result is the exposure of local populations in the developing world to an assortment of food contaminants which, more often than not, result in the death or hospitalization of people that have eaten these tainted products. Rapid Industrialization As developing countries continue to move towards industrialization in order to become more competitive in the global economy, this often adversely impacts local ecological systems. China for example is widely considered to be a modern day success story wherein through progressive economic policies and a focus on making the local economy more open towards foreign capital investments the end result has been the creation of the world’s second largest economy with a massive industrial base. This has enabled Chinese society to reinvent itself resulting in a distinct shift towards urban lifestyles and the development of a greater predilection towards the trappings of modern day living (i.e. the use of cars, apartments, modern day gadgetry etc.) Unfortunately, the price that was paid for such â€Å"progress† has been a significant degree of environmental pollution evidenced by the sheer amount of toxic smog within China’s industrial centres which has been blamed for the rising cases of lung cancer and other lung related illnesses (Zheng Kahn 2013). Furthermore, social stratification within the country brought about by an almost nonexistent â€Å"trickle- down effect† has resulted in deplorable living conditions for the worker class and the urban poor while the Chinese elite enjoy lifestyles comparable to upper and middle class societies within Europe (Zheng Kahn 2013). When examining such an example and comparing it to the â€Å"push towards industrialization† seen within many developing societies at the present, it can be seen that the developing world is bearing the brunt of the current outsourcing industry resulting in the proliferation of illnesses related to the sheer amount of pollutants released into their local environment. Conclusion Based on the results of the examination, it was shown in this paper that exposure to subpar food safety standards as well as pollution through rapid industrialization has significantly impacted the life expectancy of local populations within the developing world.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on The Impact of Rapid Indust rialization on Life Expectancy specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Reference List Al-Kandari, D, Jukes, D 2012, ‘The food control system in Saudi Arabia – Centralizing food control activities’, Food Control, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 33-46 Baumgartner, PA 2000, ‘Food safety’, Australian Journal Of Nutrition Dietetics, vol. 57, no.4, pp. 227-228 Condrad Holton, WW 2000, ‘Fresh Ideas for Food Safety’, Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 108, no.11, p. 516 Zheng, S, Kahn, M 2013, ‘Understanding China’s Urban Pollution Dynamics’, Journal Of Economic Literature, vol.51, no.3, pp. 731-772 This essay on The Impact of Rapid Industrialization on Life Expectancy was written and submitted by user Gertrude Yorkes to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

5 Warning Signs You Should NOT Take The Job

5 Warning Signs You Should NOT Take The Job You’ve been looking for a long time and you’ve finally landed an interview. You think to yourself: This is the job. I have to get this job. And then it looks as though you might actually be hired. Trouble is, there are some red flags. Failure to spot these warning signs might result in you ending up right back where you started, looking for a job. Here are five things to watch for before accepting an offer, even when you’re desperate.1. Herky jerky interview processYou get called in, you interview, and then you don’t hear anything for weeks. Then maybe they call you in again, you do another interview, and†¦ radio silence. If your hiring process is this erratic- without some suitable explanation (some crisis at the company, or an unexpected leave of absence by your supervisor), then it’s time to ask yourself 1: whether you can be bothered being treated this way, and 2: what would it be like to actually work for a company that treated potential h ires this way? If you really really want the job, it’s okay to give them a second chance (though maybe not a third). Just keep your eyes open and your feelers out for other opportunities.2. They’re all about themThere’s a constant stream of requests. We need this from you. And we need that. First a writing sample, then a project on spec, then a statement, then a test. They don’t seem to have any respect for your effort or your time. You’re not given space to ask your interviewers any questions. Sound familiar? Run away.The interview process should be just as much about them recruiting you. If they start to get really demanding and ask for really in-depth work, suggest an hourly consulting rate for that work. Until you have a guarantee of employment, make sure you get paid.3. They’re shadyBy the end of the interview, you’re not sure exactly what your position entails, who you’d report to, what the compensation and benefits would be. You note a lack of any real leadership in the team, and you can’t discern any real structure. Most importantly, if you’ve asked questions and fewer than half of them have been answered to your satisfaction, that’s a sign of major disorganization, even chaos. Run away.4. They’re nosyYou start getting questions about your past position, your past salary, your personal financial details. None of this is really relevant to your potentially being hired. They only need to know what your target salary range is now. Nothing more. And even that you shouldn’t tell them until they’ve specified their range for the position first.5. They give you an ultimatumYou get an offer letter out of nowhere. First of all, that letter should really be a phone call or an email from the person you’ve been speaking with, suggesting they’re ready to make an offer and opening negotiations with you. And if they make it clear there will be no negotiation s (â€Å"We have a dozen other candidates who will take this offer as it stands†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ), then you should probably turn your back and wait for a company that will respect both you and the process of bringing a new employee on board.

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Literature course Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Literature course - Essay Example Why are we joking about this? It is taking away from everything we are striving for. Why is it that the media, especially television, still picture women as cooks, cleaners, housekeepers and filling gender-specific roles. This disturbs me no end. I thought all along that we were trying to be a more open-minded society where women are known to be strong, able to occupy powerful positions and at times be even superior to men. (example of irony) We must never underestimate women. Remember Joan of Arc and how she led the French army in the war against the English and winning? Wasn’t it a woman- Cleopatra and not a pharaoh who ruled Egypt successfully for a time until the snake was her undoing? And today, we have women invading areas of human endeavor where men heretofore held sway. Most modern families have mothers who are both housekeepers and breadwinners at the same time. We now have women astronauts, company CEO’s, doctors, professors, etc. In American politics, Nancy Pelosi heads the House of Representatives, Condoleeza Rice is the U.S, roving ambassador and doing a wonderful job of mediating with the leaders of countries all over the world. And Hillary Clinton is running for the Presidency. Is America breeding a race of super-women? In the field of entertainment, both screen and stage, American actresses take the lead. In Religion, there are more nuns than priests; however, we still have to see the fairer sex wearing the Fisherman’s ring. (This is a metaphor wherein there is reference to St. Peter, the first Pope, the first one to wear the Fisherman’s ring.) There are still things which women can do better than the men and other things which only women can do and no man can. God meant for women to conceive, carry babies in their wombs and give birth. Then they create a loving and nurturing environment for the children and teach them proper